Dec. 11: EduColor- A Movement Not a Moment

Focus: Advocacy, teacher activism, and intersectional work

Lead Facilitators: Yamil Báez, Keith Catone, EduColor

Date: December 11th, 2018

Time: 4:30-7:00 pm

Location: The Met School’s Black Box Theatre | 325 Public Street | Providence, RI 02905

Seminar Description:

EduColor is a national community of advocates dedicated to the constant, beautiful struggle for liberation, including an equitable, just education for everyone. Providing a web of support, co-conspirators, and resources, EduColor's work strives to reflect, uphold, and promote a rich set of principles found on EduColor’s website and copied for you below. We are educators, parents, students, writers and activists. Two EduColor leaders from Rhode Island, Yamil Báez and Keith Catone, will facilitate a seminar that seeks to deepen our understanding of how EduColor's principles are and/or can be reflected in the work being done in RI to advance an equitable, just education for everyone.

Yamil has been a member of EduColor since December of 2015.  A resident of Providence, Rhode Island for over thirty years, Yamil is of Dominican descent and grew up in that country and in the U.S. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Italian; Bachelor of Arts in Spanish and Master of Arts in Spanish, all from the University of Rhode Island, Kingston.  She is a 2017 graduate of Providence College’s Teacher Certification Program. Previously a teacher of Spanish and Italian, in addition to World Language Chair for 6th – 12th grades at the Moses Brown School, Providence, Yamil now teaches at Durfee High School in Fall River, MA.  Yamil served on the Providence School Board from January 2014 to January 2017.  She has served on the Boards of the Providence After School Alliance; the Latino Policy Institute at Roger Williams University, the Providence Community Library as the Mayor’s Community Appointee, the Providence Journal’s Race in RI Sounding Board and the Latino College Access Coalition Advisory Board, the RI Latino Arts Board and the Providence Community Library Advisory Council.  A member of EduColor’s Steering Committee, Yamil is also EduColor’s chat coordinator.

Keith has been a member of EduColor since 2014.  Before becoming Executive Director of CYCLE - the Center for Youth & Community Leadership in Education, Keith Catone served as Associate Director for Community Organizing and Engagement at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform and Adjunct Assistant Professor of Education at Brown University. He was the project director for the Youth 4 Change Alliance in Providence, RI and co-founded the New York Collective of Radical Educators, a citywide grassroots teacher activist group, while teaching high school social studies in the Bronx. Keith serves on the board of directors for the Education for Liberation Network and has authored numerous research and opinion pieces. His first book, The Pedagogy of Teacher Activism: Portraits of Four Teachers for Justice, explores connections between pedagogical purpose, power, and possibility in the context of working with teachers, youth, families, and communities to change the world. Keith has an AB in public policy from Brown University and an EdM in school leadership and EdD in culture, communities, and education from Harvard University. Aside from educational justice, the things he loves most in life are his son, partner, kitchens, and karaoke.

 

From EduColor:

These are the principles that were developed with profound love and respect by the EduColor collective. We dedicate ourselves to these principles in all of our works.

  • We are dedicated to the constant, beautiful struggle for liberation, including an equitable, just education for everyone.
  • We believe it is everyone’s responsibility to critically examine their role in working toward justice.
  • We strive to build a new, better, more effective way of reaching equity and justice in public education.

This can only be achieved through:

  • Addressing systemic inequities of race, gender, ability, sexual orientation, class, occupation, age, religious belief, language, and power—and fighting for and building alternative equitable structures for public education.
  • Recognizing that all of us have been socialized in oppressive ways, and thus need to embark upon an ongoing process of unlearning and relearning to address our own privilege and/or internalized oppression as a necessary first step towards dismantling the systemic oppression our individual biases reinforce and reproduce.
  • Amplifying the voices of communities of color to advocate for their own vision for public education.
  • Providing a seat at decision-making tables or in forums where the people we work to serve can express their own lived experiences specifically for educators, activists, community leaders, parents, and students in underserved communities.
  • Creating long-term leadership opportunities for people of color at all levels of the educational system and across overlapping identities.
  • Restructuring pedagogies through critical cultural lenses, including but not limited to curating and assisting in the creation of resources and support for administrators and educators to use with students.
  • Protecting public education for all people, especially from current movements to destroy it.
  • Actively working to direct public education towards removing its legacy of oppression, exclusion and disenfranchisement that is a fundamental feature of the system.